Mental Health Services - Oversight And Accountability Commision

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About MHSOAC

In November 2004, California voters passed Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act (MHSA) The law calls for the establishment of the Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission (MHSOAC). Section 10 of the MHSA (Welfare and Institutions Code Section 5845) established the Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission (MHSOAC) and defined the creation and composition of the Commission.

The MHSOAC oversees the Adults and Older Adults Systems of Care Act; Human Resources; Innovative Programs; Prevention & Early Intervention Programs; and the Children’s Mental Health Services Act. The Commission replaced the advisory committee which had been established pursuant to Welfare and Institutions Code Section 5814.

MHSOAC Oversees the MHSA

The role of the Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission (MHSOAC) is to oversee the implementation of the Mental Health Services Act (MHSA).   The MHSOAC is also responsible for developing strategies to overcome stigma.  At any time, the MHSOAC may advise the Governor or the Legislature on mental health policy. 

In the past, the MHSOAC has been responsible for review and approval of county plans for the Prevention & Early Intervention (PEI) and Innovation Program components of the MHSA.  After the passage of Assembly Bill 100 (AB100) in March 2011, the role of the Commission shifted from review and approval of county plans to providing training and technical assistance for county mental health planning as needed. Additionally, the Commission evaluates MHSA-funded programs throughout the State.  When AB 1467 passed in June 2012, the MHSOAC’s role of training and technical assistance and evaluation expanded; approval of county Innovation plans by the MHSOAC was also reinstated.  The MHSOAC receives all county 3-year plans, annual updates, and annual Revenue and Expenditure Reports.

Our Mission

Provide vision and leadership, in collaboration with clients, their family members, and underserved communities, to ensure Californians understand mental health is essential to overall health. Hold public mental health systems accountable. Provide oversight for eliminating disparities; promote wellness, recovery and resiliency; and ensure positive outcomes for individuals living with serious mental illness and their families.